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Visiting Emanuel Swedenborg's Shares (account name: swedenborg)
 
 2017 July -​​ Dec Worship Information
  

 

 

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:  John Gwynn

Organist: Jonathan Dimmock

Prelude: Dies sind die heiligen zehn Gebot ("These are the holy ten commandments") by J. S. Bach (1685-1750)

Hymn 1: #77: Joyful, joyful, we adore thee

Responsive Invocation:

 

You, God, are my God, earnestly I seek you;
I thirst for you, my whole being longs for you,
in a dry and parched land where there is no water.

       I have seen you in the sanctuary
    and beheld your power and your glory.

Because your love is better than life, 

my lips will glorify you.
   I will praise you as long as I live,
    and in your name I will lift up my hands.

 

I will be fully satisfied as with the richest of foods;
with singing lips my mouth will praise you.

       On my bed I remember you;
    I think of you through the watches of the night.

Because you are my help, 

I sing in the shadow of your wings.
   I cling to you; your right hand upholds me. 

.

1st Scripture Reading: 2 Samuel 5:1-5
Solo:
God is all there is   

   Music by Mary Watkins (b. 1939)

      Heidi Waterman, mezzo soprano


2nd Scripture Reading:
John 12:1-8

Hymn 2:  #3 Love divine, all loves excelling

Sermon Title: Samuel Anoints David as King
Anthem:
Ain'a that good news   by William Dawson (1899-1990)

Offertory: Tierce en taille  by Jacques Boyvin

Hymn 3: #65  Now thank we all our God

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude: Fugue in G minor   J. S. Bach

Swedenborg Passage: edited from Divine Providence #3

 

The universe as a whole and in every detail was created out of divine love, by means of divine wisdom. The Lord from eternity, who is Jehovah, is essentially divine love and wisdom, and that he himself created the universe and everything in it out of himself.

Everything that meets our eyes in this world can serve to convince us that the universe and absolutely everything in it was created out of divine love by means of divine wisdom. Take any particular thing and look at it with some wisdom, and this will be clear.

A force is instilled into everything that has been created. However, the force does not do anything on its own; it depends on the one who instilled it. Look at some other subject on our planet. Look at a silkworm or a bee or some little creature and examine it, first physically, then rationally, and finally spiritually. If you can think deeply, you will be stunned at everything. If you listen to the inner voice of wisdom, you will exclaim in amazement, “Can anyone fail to see Divinity here? These are the marks of divine wisdom!” Beyond this even, if you look at the functions of everything that has been created, you will see how they follow in sequence all the way to humanity and from us to our source, the Creator. You will see how the connectedness of everything depends on the Creator’s union with us; and if you are willing to admit it, the preservation of everything depends on this as well.

 

 

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Organist: Arthur Omura (audition)

Prelude: Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott (BWV 720)    J. S. Bach (1685-1750)

Hymn 1: #15 Sweet Hour of Prayer

Responsive Invocation: xx

1st Scripture Reading: 2 Samuel 5:6-10
2nd Scripture Reading: Luke 13:31-35

Hymn 2:  #244 He Leadeth Me

Sermon Title: David & Jerusalem
Anthem: And I saw a new Heaven   Omura (b. 1986)

Offertory: Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten (BWV 691)   Bach

Hymn 3: #372 Bunessan

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude: Valet will ich dir geben (BWV 735a)     Bach

Swedenborg Passage: xx

 

 

Sunday, October 8, 2017 - Worship in Meditation

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Meditation with Music: xx

1st Scripture Reading: Jeremiah 23:9-22

2nd Scripture Reading: Matthew 7:15-27

Reflection with Music: xx

Postlude: xx

Swedenborg Passage:

 

 

Sunday, October 15, 2017 - Interactive Worship

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Hymn 1: xx

Responsive Invocation: xx

1st Scripture Reading: 2 Samuel 6:1-23
Solo: xx
2nd Scripture Reading:
Mark 11:11-17

Hymn 2:  xx

Sermon Title: David & The Arc of The Covenant
Anthem: xx

Offertory: xx

Hymn 3: xx

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:

Swedenborg Passage: xx

 

 

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Preacher: Christine Rodgers

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Hymn 1: xx

Responsive Invocation: xx

1st Scripture Reading: xx
Solo: xx
2nd Scripture Reading:
xx

Hymn 2:  xx

Sermon Title: xx
Anthem: xx

Offertory: xx

Hymn 3: xx

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:

Swedenborg Passage: xx

 

 

Sunday, October 29, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Hymn 1: xx

Responsive Invocation: xx

1st Scripture Reading: 2 Samuel 7:1-17
Solo: xx
2nd Scripture Reading:
Luke 1:67-79

Hymn 2:  xx

Sermon Title: God's Covenant with David
Anthem: xx

Offertory: xx

Hymn 3: xx

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:

Swedenborg Passage: xx

 

Sunday, November 5, 2017 - Communion Luncheon

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Hymn 1: xx

Responsive Invocation: xx

1st Scripture Reading: 2 Samuel 7:18-29
Solo: xx
2nd Scripture Reading:
Luke 11:1-13

Hymn 2:  xx

Sermon Title: David's Prayer
Anthem: xx

Offertory: xx

Hymn 3: xx

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:

Swedenborg Passage: xx

 

Sunday, November 12, 2017 - Worship in Meditation

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Meditation with Music: xx

1st Scripture Reading: Ezekiel 17:1-10

2nd Scripture Reading: Luke 8:1-15

Reflection with Music: xx

Postlude: xx

Swedenborg Passage:

 

Sunday, November 19, 2017 - Thanksgiving Service

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Hymn 1: xx

Responsive Invocation: xx

1st Scripture Reading: Isaiah 12:1-6
Solo: xx
2nd Scripture Reading:
2 Corinthians 9:10-12

Hymn 2:  xx

Sermon Title: xx
Anthem: xx

Offertory: xx

Hymn 3: xx

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:

Swedenborg Passage: xx

 

 

Sunday, November 26, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Doug Moss

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Hymn 1: xx

Responsive Invocation: xx

1st Scripture Reading: xx
Solo: xx
2nd Scripture Reading:
xx

Hymn 2:  xx

Sermon Title: xx
Anthem: xx

Offertory: xx

Hymn 3: xx

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:

Swedenborg Passage: xx

 

Sunday, December 3, 2017   Advent I

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Hymn 1: xx

Responsive Invocation: xx

1st Scripture Reading: John 1:1-5
Solo: xx
2nd Scripture Reading:
Daniel 2:21-23

Hymn 2:  xx

Sermon Title: Jesus as The Word
Anthem: xx

Offertory: xx

Hymn 3: xx

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:

Swedenborg Passage: xx

 

Sunday, December 10, 2017 - Worship in Meditation   Advent II

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Meditation with Music: xx

1st Scripture Reading: John 1:1-5

2nd Scripture Reading: Proverbs 8:22-31

Reflection with Music: xx

Postlude: xx

Swedenborg Passage:

 

Sunday, December 17, 2017    Advent III

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Hymn 1: xx

Responsive Invocation: xx

1st Scripture Reading: John 1:14-18
Solo: xx
2nd Scripture Reading:
1John 1:1-10

Hymn 2:  xx

Sermon Title: The Word Became Flesh
Anthem: xx

Offertory: xx

Hymn 3: xx

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:

Swedenborg Passage: xx

 

Sunday, December 24, 2017 - Eve 5:30

Preacher: Rev. Kathy Speas

Liturgist:

 

Sunday, December 24, 2017 - Eve 7

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

 

Sunday, December 24, 2017 - Eve 9

Preacher: Rev. Doug Moss

Liturgist:

 

 

Sunday, December 31, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:

Prelude: xx

Hymn 1: xx

Responsive Invocation: xx

1st Scripture Reading: Isaiah 54:1-5
Solo: xx
2nd Scripture Reading:
Colossians 3:9-10

Hymn 2:  xx

Sermon Title: New Self for The New Year
Anthem: xx

Offertory: xx

Hymn 3: xx

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:

Swedenborg Passage: xx

 

 

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Lee

Liturgist:  Nancy Leras

Organist: Matthew Lee Cannon

Prelude: Prelude in G major   Johann Pachelbel  (1653-1706)

Hymn 1: Insert - Spirit of Life    Vs. 1,2,4,5

Responsive Invocation:

For the Lord has chosen Zion;

   he has desired it for his habitation:

 

This is my resting place forever;

   here I will reside, for I have desired it.

 

I will abundantly bless its provisions;

   I will satisfy its poor with bread.

 

Its priests I will clothe with salvation,

   and its faithful will shout for joy.

 

There I will cause a horn to sprout up for David;

   I have prepared a lamp for my anointed one.

 

1st Scripture Reading: I Samuel 21:1-15
Solo: For the Mountains Shall Depart

              from Elijah

  Music by Felix Mendelssohn   (1809-47)

 

      Steven Rogino, baritone
2nd Scripture Reading:
Matthew 12:1-8

Hymn 2:  9   Pilgrim  Vs. 1,3,4

Sermon Title: David and the Bread of Presence

Offertory: Improvisation in C major   Pachelbel

Hymn 3: 69   Sicilian Mariners' Hymn

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:  Prelude in D minor    Pachelbel

Swedenborg Passage: Heavenly Secrets #276

 Bread means everything of a spiritual or heavenly character, which is food for
the angels. If they were deprived of it, they could not live, any more than
a person deprived of bread or food can. The heavenly and spiritual things
existing in heaven also correspond to the bread on earth. Moreover they
are represented by bread, as can be seen in many passages.
The Lord is bread because everything heavenly or spiritual comes
from him, as he teaches in John:
This is the bread that came down from heaven. Whoever eats this
bread will live forever. (John 6:58)
In consequence, bread and wine are symbols in the Holy Supper. This
heavenly aspect was represented by the manna as well [Exodus 16:4–31].
The fact that heavenly and spiritual things are angels’ food is also clear
from the Lord’s words:
Humankind shall not live on bread alone but on every word coming
out of God’s mouth. (Matthew 4:4)
That is, humankind is to live on the Lord’s life, the source of every heavenly and spiritual quality.

 

 

Sunday, July 9, 2017 - Worship in Meditation

Worship Leader: John Gwynn

Liturgist:  None

Prelude:  Introductory Voluntary    Francis Linley (1771-1800)

Meditation with Music:  Arise, My Love    Joel Martinson  (b. 1960)

1st Scripture Reading: Ephesians 5:14

2nd Scripture Reading: Matthew 13:11-15

Reflection with Music: Salve Regina   Giacomo Puccini   (1858-1924)

Postlude: Sortie    Léon Boëllmann  (1862-97)

Swedenborg Passage: Secrets of Heaven §150

Our condition when we rely on ourselves or when we think we live by our own power can be compared to slumber or unconsciousness. The people of old actually called that condition slumber, and the Word speaks of it as “being flooded with a spirit of slumber” [Isaiah 29:10] and “sleeping a sleep” [Jeremiah 51:39, 57].

 

The truth that human selfhood is inherently dead, that none of us has any life on his own, is demonstrated in the world of spirits by vivid experience-so vivid that evil spirits, who love nothing but selfhood or a sense of autonomy and obstinately insist that they live independently, become convinced and admit that life is not theirs after all.

 

I more than any other have been given the opportunity in the last several years to see what “human autonomy” amounts to, finding as I have that not a single one of my thoughts originated in me. I have been able to perceive with utmost clarity that every component idea in my thinking has come from outside, and sometimes I have seen where it came from and how it entered.

 

Therefore those who suppose they live by their own power have it wrong. By believing that they live independently, they adopt all possible evil and falsity as their own, and this they would never do if they believed the situation to be as it really is.
 
 

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Doug Moss

Liturgist:  Chris Hammer

Prelude: Pastorale   Sigfrid Karg-Elert  (1877-1933)

Hymn 1: 56   Jubilate   Vs.1,2,4

Responsive Invocation:

Blessed is the one who does not walk in step with the wicked or stand in the way that sinners take or sit in the company of mockers, 
But whose delight is in the law of the Lord, and who meditates on His law day and night. 
 
That person is like a tree planted by streams of water, which yields its fruit in season 
And whose leaf does not wither, for the Lord watches over the way of the righteous.

1st Scripture Reading: 2 Samuel 11:26-12:9a
Solo: If with all your hearts

             from Elijah

   Music by Felix Mendelssohn  (1809-47)

           Kevin Gibbs, tenor
2nd Scripture Reading:
 Romans 7:14-25

Hymn 2:  36   Dundee

Sermon Title: There but for the Grace of God go I
Anthem: The Eyes of All Wait Upon Thee

      Text: Psalm 145:15,16     Music by Jean Berger  (1909-2002)        

Offertory: Dialogo per Organo   Adriano Banchieri  (1568-1634)

Hymn 3: Insert - Standing on the Promises   Vs. 1,2,4,5

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude: Triumphal March   Edvard Grieg   (1843-1907)

Swedenborg Passage: Secrets of Heaven §904

     The Lord talks to every individual, because anything good or true that a person wills or thinks comes from the Lord. We each have at least two evil spirits and two angels with us. The evil spirits stir up our evils, but the angels inspire goodness and truth. Everything good or true that the angels inspire in us is the Lord’s, so the Lord is constantly talking to us. He talks very differently, though, to one person than to another. With those who allow themselves to be swept up by evil spirits, the Lord speaks like one absent or far away, so that he can barely be said to speak at all. But with those whom he leads, the Lord speaks more directly. The fact that no one can ever think anything good or true except by the Lord’s power makes this sufficiently clear.
 

 

Sunday, July 23, 2017 - Interactive Worship

Preacher: Rev. Lee

Liturgist:  Robert Carr

Prelude: Meditation    Alexandre Guilmant (1837-1911)

Hymn 1: Insert- Let All Things Now Living

Responsive Invocation:

 

Incline your ear, O Lord, and answer me,
for I am poor and needy.
     Preserve my life, for I am devoted to you;
    save your servant who trusts in you.


You are my God; be gracious to me, O Lord,
for to you do I cry all day long.
     Gladden the soul of your servant,
    for to you, O Lord, I lift up my soul.


For you, O Lord, are good and forgiving,
abounding in steadfast love to all who call on you.
     In the day of my trouble I call on you,
    for you will answer me.

 

1st Scripture Reading: 1 Samuel 17:41-51
Solo:  Schafe können sicher weiden

         Sheep May Safely Graze

            from Cantata 208  (Hunt)  

      Music by J.S. Bach   (1685-1750)

 

            Diana Pray, soprano


2nd Scripture Reading:
Matthew 17:14-21

Hymn 2:  212. Hodges

Sermon Title: David & Goliath: fighting against the champion of falsity
Anthem: The Lord is My Shepherd

              Text: Psalm 23

            Music by Howard Goodall   (b. 1958)

Offertory: Flight of Angels

   from Pieces for a Musical Clock.   G.F. Handel. (1685-1759)

Hymn 3: 244 He Leadeth Me.  Vs. 1-3

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude: Voluntary in G    John Stanley  (1713-86)

Swedenborg Passage: Secrets of Heaven #1197

 

 The ancient church used the label of Philistine for all those who talked and talked about faith and about the idea that salvation is found in faith and yet completely failed to live a life of faith. For this reason, Philistines more than any others were also described as uncircumcised, meaning that they lacked charity. (For passages that refer to them as uncircumcised, see 1 Samuel 14:6; 17:26, 36; 31:4; 2 Samuel 1:20; and other places.)
These people by nature could not help turning religious knowledge into a matter of memorization. The knowledge of spiritual and heavenly realities and even the mysteries of faith become nothing more than objects of memory when the people who are adept at them have no love for others. Memorized details are dead objects to us unless we live according to them as a matter of conscience. When we do, then as soon as something becomes part of our memory it also becomes part of our life. That is when it first becomes something in us that remains useful to us and our salvation after physical life ends. Neither secular nor religious knowledge
means anything to us in the other life—even if we have learned all the secrets that have ever been revealed—unless it permeates our life.

 

 

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:  Laurie Carlson

Prelude: Elevation    Dom Paul Benoit  (1893-1979)

Hymn 1: Insert - When in Our Music   Vs. 1,2,3,5

Responsive Invocation:

 

O give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; for his steadfast love endures forever.  

   For the Lord satisfies the thirsty, and the hungry the Lord fills with good things.

 

The Lord turns rivers into a desert, springs of water into thirsty ground, 

     a fruitful land into a salty waste, because of the wickedness of its inhabitants.

 

When they are diminished and brought low through oppression, trouble, and sorrow, he pours contempt on princes and makes them wander in trackless wastes;

      but he raises up the needy out of distress, and makes their families like flocks.

 

The upright see it and are glad; and all wickedness stops its mouth.

      Let those who are wise give heed to these things, and consider the steadfast love of the Lord.

 

1st Scripture Reading: 1 Samuel 26:1-12
Solo: A Song of David

  Text: Psalm 120   Music by Ned Rorem  (b. 1923)

        Maria Meyer, mezzo soprano
2nd Scripture Reading:
Matthew 5:43-44

Hymn 2:  294   St. Agnes   Vs. 1,2,5,6

Sermon Title: Living by divine providence by means of self control  
Anthem: 
Beatitudes

     Text based on Matthew 5:3-9

       Music by Peter Amidon

Offertory: Offrande    Flor Peeters   (1903-86)

Hymn 3: 204 Posen

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude: Prelude, Dialogue    Nicolas Lebegue  (1631-1702)

Swedenborg Passage: Divine Love & Wisdom #358

 We read that we were created in the image of God and according to his likeness (Genesis 1:26). In this passage “the image of God” means divine wisdom and “the likeness of God” means divine love, since wisdom is nothing more than the image of love. Love actually presents itself to view and to recognition in wisdom, and since that is where we see and recognize it, wisdom is its image. Then too, love is the reality of life and wisdom is its consequent manifestation. This “image and likeness” of God is strikingly visible in angels. Love shining from within is in their faces and wisdom in their beauty, with beauty as the form of their love.

 

 

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Preacher: Darleen Pryds 

Liturgist:  John Gwynn

Prelude: Komm, Heiliger Geist, Herre Gott

                Come Holy Ghost, Lord God    Georg Philipp Telemann  (1681-1767)

Hymn 1: 1  Hamburg

Responsive Invocation: 

As the deer pants for streams of water,
so my soul pants for you, my God.
    My soul thirsts for God, for the living God.
    When can I go and meet with God?

 

Deep calls to deep in the roar of your waterfalls;
    all your waves and breakers have swept over me.

 

By day the Lord directs his love, at night his song is with me—
     a prayer to the God of my life.


Why, my soul, are you downcast?  Why so disturbed within me?

Put your hope in God,
    for I will yet praise him, my Savior and my God.

 

1st Scripture Reading: Matthew 19:16-22
Anthem: The Prayer of Saint Francis    

         Text: Originally French, unattributed, published 1912

         Music by René Clausen  (b.1953) 
2nd Scripture Reading:
Jeremiah 10:1-5

Hymn 2:  Insert - The Servant Song

Sermon Title: San Francisco, Santa Clara: What Would St. Francis and St. Clare Think of the Cities Named for Them?

Offertory: Elevation   Dom Paul Benoit   (1893-1979)

Hymn 3: 203 Nuremburg

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude:   Voluntary No. 6 

                Andante, Vivace       Maurice Greene  (1695-1755)

 

Swedenborg Passage: Heaven and Hell, 364

Poor people do not get into heaven because of their poverty but because of their lives. Our lives follow us whether we are rich or poor. There is no special mercy for the one any more than for the other. People who have lived well are accepted; people who have lived badly are rejected.

Poverty can actually seduce people and lead them away from heaven just as much as wealth can. There are many people among the poor who are not content with their lot, who covet much more, and who believe that wealth is a blessing; so when they do not get what they want, they are enraged and harbor evil thoughts about divine providence.

 

 

Sunday, August 13, 2017 - Worship in Meditation

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:  Devin Zuber

Prelude: Intermezzo    Flor Peeters  (1903-86)

Meditation with Music:  Sixth Toccata   Johann Ernst Eberlin   (1702-62)

1st Scripture Reading: 1 Samuel 16:14-23

2nd Scripture Reading: Revelation 14:1-5

Reflection with Music: O Sacrum Convivium   Olivier Messiaen  (1908-92)

Postlude:  Sortie  Léon Boëllmann  (1862-97)

Swedenborg Passage: Apocalypse Revealed 792   

By “voice” is meant sound, and every sound corresponds to any affection which is of
love, since it arises therefrom. From this it is that the sounds of the
harp, of music, and of the pipe, from correspondence signify
affections. But the affections are of two kinds, spiritual and
celestial; spiritual affections are affections of wisdom, and celestial
affections are affections of love. They differ from each other as the
heavens, which are distinguished into two kingdoms, the celestial
and the spiritual, as has several times been said above. There are
therefore musical instruments whose sounds have relation to
spiritual affections, and there are those which have relation to
celestial affections. 
For the instruments whose sounds are discrete, as stringed
instruments, pertain to the class of spiritual affections; and the
instruments whose sounds are continuous, as wind instruments,
pertain to the class of celestial affections. Hence it is that the voice
or sound of “harpers and musicians” signifies the affection of
spiritual good and truth, and the voice or sound of “pipers and
trumpeters” signifies affection of celestial good and truth.

 

 

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:  Joshua Jennings

Prelude: Elevation IV

      from Heures Mystiques, Op. 29   Léon Boëllmann  (1862-97)

Hymn 1: 337 Austrian Hymn

Responsive Invocation:

 

I call to you, Lord, come quickly to me;

    hear me when I call to you.

 

May my prayer be set before you like incense;

    may the lifting up of my hands be like the evening sacrifice.

 

Set a guard over my mouth, Lord;

    keep watch over the door of my lips.

 

Keep me safe from the traps set by evildoers, from the snares they have laid for me.

 Let the wicked fall into their own nets, while I pass by in safety.

 

1st Scripture Reading: 1 Samuel 27:1-12
Anthem:
Let My Prayer Rise Up Like Incense

     Text adapted from Psalm 141    Music by Marty Haugen (b.1950)
2nd Scripture Reading:
  Luke 9:46-48

Hymn 2:  Insert - For the Healing of the Nations

Sermon Title: What is in a preparation to be great? 
Anthem: Turn, Turn, Turn

    Words adapted from Ecclesiastes 3:1-8

    Music by Pete Seeger  (1919-2014)

Offertory: Allegretto cantabile   Flor Peeters (1903-86)

Hymn 3: 229 Hesperus

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude: Sortie    César Franck (1822-90)

Swedenborg Passage: Divine Providence 211

 There is a reason why divine providence works so subtly that hardly
anyone knows it is there—to keep us from dying. That is, our own
self-importance, which is what motivates us, never cooperates with divine
providence. Our self-importance has an inborn hatred of divine
providence. It is actually the serpent that misled our first parents, the serpent
of whom it is said, “I will set enmity between you and the woman
and between your seed and her seed, and it will trample your head”
(Genesis 3:15). “The serpent” is any kind of evil, and “its head” is love for
ourselves. “The woman’s seed” is the Lord, and “the enmity that is set” is
between our love of self-importance and the Lord, and therefore also between
our own prudence and the Lord’s divine providence. This is
because our prudence is constantly trying to raise its head and divine
providence is constantly trying to push it down.
[2] If we sensed this, we would be outraged and enraged against God,
and we would die. When we do not sense it, though, we get outraged
and enraged against others, against ourselves, and against chance, which
is not fatal. This is why the Lord in his divine providence is constantly leading us
in our freedom, and to us it seems as though this freedom were our own.

 

 

Sunday, August 27, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Lee

Liturgist:  Andrew Jack Dodd

Prelude: Prelude Chorale in E    César Franck  (1822-90)

Hymn 1: 372  Bunessan

Responsive Invocation:

Praise the Lord, my soul;
    all my inmost being, praise his holy name.


Praise the Lord, my soul, and forget not all his benefits—
     who forgives all your sins and heals all your diseases,


who redeems your life from the pit and crowns you with love and compassion,
     who satisfies your desires with good things so that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s.

 

1st Scripture Reading: Deuteronomy 16:1-8
Anthem: Rejoice in the Lord Alway    

     Text: Philippians 4:4-7    Music by Henry Purcell  (1659-95)   
2nd Scripture Reading:
 John 6:35-40

Hymn 2:  175  Supplication

Sermon Title: The Bread of Affliction & The Bread from Heaven 
Anthem: How Firm a Foundation    

     Anonymous text, from Rippon’s A Selection of Hymns, 1787

     Music by John Karl Hirten  (b. 1956)

Offertory: Improvisation    Flor Peeters  (1903-86)

Hymn 3: Insert - Lord of the Dance

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude: Grand Choeur    Théodore Salome (1843-96)

Swedenborg Passage: Arcana Coelestia #9992

 

 [2] 'Unleavened' means what has been purified because 'yeast' means falsity arising from evil, so that 'unleavened' or made without yeast means pure or free from that falsity. 'Yeast' means falsity arising from evil because such falsity defiles good, and truth as well, and also because it gives rise to conflict; for when that falsity gets near good, agitation occurs, and when it gets near truth, a collision takes place. All this explains why a minchah consisting of unleavened bread was included in burnt offerings and sacrifices. Therefore it was decreed that every minchah which they brought to Jehovah should be made without yeast, Lev. 2:11; that they should not sacrifice the blood of a sacrifice with anything made with yeast, Exod. 23:18; and that during the feast of Passover they should not eat anything made with yeast, and that anyone eating it should be cut off from Israel, Exod. 12:15, 18-20. The reason why anyone who ate anything made with yeast during the feast of Passover should be cut off from Israel was that the feast of Passover was a sign of deliverance from damnation, and in particular of deliverance from falsities arising from evil, accomplished with those who allow themselves to be regenerated by the Lord. This also explains why it was called the feast of unleavened bread.

 

 

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:  Nancy Leras

Organist: Arthur Omura

Prelude: Echo Fantasia (Dorian) Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (1562 - 1621)

Hymn 1: Insert - In Christ There Is No East or West

Responsive Invocation:

 

Let all the faithful pray to you while you may be found;
   surely the rising of the mighty waters will not reach them.

 

You are my hiding place; you will protect me from trouble
    and surround me with songs of deliverance.

 

I will instruct you and teach you in the way you should go;
    I will counsel you with my loving eye on you.

Many are the woes of the wicked, but the Lord’s unfailing love
surrounds the one who trusts in him.

    Rejoice in the Lord and be glad, you righteous;
    sing, all you who are upright in heart!

 

1st Scripture Reading: 1 Samuel 28:3-25
Duet:  Simple Gifts

         Shaker Song

  Words and Music by Joseph Brackett (1797–1882)

  Adapted by Aaron Copland (1900-90)

  Arranged by Irving Fine  (1914-62)

 

          Diana Pray, soprano

         Steven Rogino, baritone


2nd Scripture Reading:
Leviticus 19:31

Hymn 2:  137  Trentham

Sermon Title: Saul Consults A Medium

Offertory: Deposuit ... et exaltavit     Anon. (16th c.)

Hymn 3: 140  Austria

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude: Echo Fantasia (Aeolian) Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (1562 - 1621)

Swedenborg Passage: Divine Providence #206 

 

  Where our own prudence comes from and what it is. It comes from
what we regard as our own. This is natural to us and is called the soul we
get from our parent. This possession of ours is a love for ourselves and a
consequent love for the world, or a love for the world and a consequent
love for ourselves. By its nature, love for ourselves focuses solely on ourselves and regards others either as worthless or as nothing. If it attaches
any importance to them, it lasts only as long as they respect and worship
it. At the heart of this love, like the effort to bear fruit and propagate in a
seed, is a latent desire to become great—if possible, to become monarch,
and then if possible to become God. The devil is like this because the
devil is pure love for oneself, a love that inherently worships only itself
and favors only those who also worship it. It hates any other devil who is
like itself, because it wants to be the only object of worship.
Since no love can exist without its partner, and since the partner of
love or volition in humans is called discernment, when love for oneself
breathes its love into its consorting discernment, that love becomes a
pride that is pride in our own intelligence. That pride is the source of our
own prudence.

 

 

Sunday, September 10, 2017 - Worship in Meditation

Preacher: Rev. Junchol Lee

Liturgist:  Devin Zuber

Organist: Sven Edward Olbash

Prelude: Contrapunctus I f rom The Art of the Fugue by  J.S. Bach (1685-1750)

Meditation with Music: Contrapunctus II, III, IV

1st Scripture Reading: Isaiah 6:1-8

2nd Scripture Reading: Luke 4:1-13 

Reflection with Music: Contrapunctus V, VI

Postlude: Contrapunctus VII

Swedenborg Passage: Divine Love & Wisdom #361

 Does anyone fail to realize, simply on the basis of common sense,
that people who live good lives are saved and people who live evil lives
are damned? That people who live well come to be with angels and see,
hear, and talk there like people? Or that the people who have a conscience
are the ones who do what is fair because it is fair and what is right
because it is right? If people step back from common sense, though, and
give the matter serious thought, they do not know what conscience is or
that the soul can see, hear, and talk the way we can or that a good way to
live is anything more than giving to the poor. Then if you start writing
on the basis of this thinking, you support these opinions with superficial
and deceptive observations and with words that are all sound and no substance.
This is why many of the scholars who have given much thought
to this—and even more, the ones who have written about it—have undermined,
obscured, and even destroyed their common sense. This is
also why simple people see what is good and true more clearly than people
who believe they are wiser.
This common sense comes from an inflow from heaven and descends
through thought all the way to sight; but thought separated from common
sense fades into fantasy based on sight and on self-importance.

 

 

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Preacher: Rev. Doug Moss

Liturgist:  Chris Hammer

Organist: Sven Edward Olbash

Prelude: Melody in G  Alexandre Guilmant (1837-1911)

Hymn 1: xx

Responsive Invocation: from Psalm 119

With my whole heart I seek you; do not let me stray from your commandments. 
I treasure your word in my heart, so that I may not sin against you. 
 
Blessed are you, O Lord; teach me your statutes. 
With my lips I declare all the ordinances of your mouth. 
 
I delight in the way of your decrees as much as in all riches. 
I will delight in your statutes; I will not forget your word.

 

1st Scripture Reading: Genesis 11:1-9
Solo: 
The Call

    from Five Mystical Songs

 Words by George Herbert (1593-1633)

 Music by Ralph Vaughan Williams  (1872-1958)

 

   Steven Rogino, baritone


2nd Scripture Reading:
Galatians 3:23-29

Hymn 2:  Insert - One Bread, One Body

Sermon Title: Babeling on... (spell as written)
Anthem: Now Let Us All Praise God and Sing    

    Words and Music by Gordon Young   (1919-98)

Offertory: Cantabile   Guilmant

Hymn 3: xx

Recessional: Nunc

Postlude: Procession   Guilmant

Swedenborg Passage: Secrets of Heaven §457

Almost all who come into the next life from the world think that hell is the same for everyone and heaven is the same for everyone, when in reality there are unlimited differences and variations in either case. Hell is never exactly the same for one person as for another, nor is heaven—just as there is never one person, spirit, or angel who is exactly the same as another.
 
When I merely entertained the thought that there could be two people precisely the same or identical, it aroused horror among those in the world of spirits and among the angels of heaven. “All unity is formed out of harmony among many,” they said. “The way that the many harmonize determines what kind of unity they have. No monolithic unity lasts, only the unity created by harmony. So every community in the heavens forms a single unit, as do all the communities—or the whole of heaven—taken together. The Lord alone makes this happen, and he does so through love.”

 

 

 


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